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Bibi Gul Ghani

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Bibi Gul Ghani

Recent Campaign



Drug addiction has been rising for the past few years. The First Lady is concerned about it and has decided to pay attention to this calamity with the hope to somehow be of help to addicts to get rid of this vicious problem.

Public advocacy awareness regarding drug addiction

Rula (Bibi Gul) Ghani

Rula (Bibi Gul) Ghani

First Lady of Islamic Republic of Afghanistan

Rula (Bibi Gul) Ghani

First Lady of Islamic Republic of Afghanistan


Born and raised in Lebanon, First Lady Rula Ghani holds a diploma from I’Institut d’Etudes Politiques de Paris, France (1969), an MA in Political Studies from the American University of Beirut (1974), and an MS in Journalism from Columbia University in New York (1983).
She met her husband, President Ashraf Ghani, at the American University of Beirut, and the couple married in March 1975. They were blessed with two children, Mariam and Tarek.
Before returning to Kabul in 2002, Rula dedicated her time to the welfare of her family while holding a series of incidental jobs. She also volunteered at the World Bank Family Network, an organization attending to the needs of the families of World Bank Group staff. 
Once back in Afghanistan, she took an interest in understanding the social challenges in Kabul and concentrated on helping Aschiana, a grassroots organization focusing on the needs of the disadvantaged children in the city.
After the election of her husband as President of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan in September 2014, she assumed the role of First Lady of Afghanistan. Together with a small team of colleagues, she is working to foster a positive environment in which every citizen of Afghanistan can achieve his/her potential and can take full part in the development of the country.

Recent Speeches / Interviews


Youth-Afghanistan's Future


"This is your world, shape it or someone else will!"

BibiGul, October 8, 2014

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The First Lady is very hopeful that the rising generations of Afghans will bring new energy to the rebuilding of Afghanistan. With her team she works hard so that the young people of this country are provided with all the opportunities to grow strong, capable, and ready to assume their responsibilities towards their homeland. Her main areas of interest are:

- literacy for all (including ensuring that middle schoolers are literate);
- vocational training (for both blue collar and white collar jobs);
- improving the educational system in schools and universities;
- cultural activities; sports activities;
- civic duties and volunteerism/caring for the environment;
- celebrating academic achievements; information on scholarships;
- encouraging networking and student alumni associations;
- welcoming back young Afghan from the diaspora.


The First Lady is very hopeful that the rising generations of Afghans will bring new energy to the rebuilding of Afghanistan. With her team she works hard so that the young people of this country are provided with all the opportunities to grow strong, capable, and ready to assume their responsibilities towards their homeland. Her main areas of interest are:

  • literacy for all (including ensuring that middle schoolers are literate);
  • vocational training (for both blue collar and white collar jobs);
  • improving the educational system in schools and universities;
  • cultural activities; sports activities;
  • civic duties and volunteerism/caring for the environment;
  • celebrating academic achievements; information on scholarships;
  • encouraging networking and student alumni associations;
  • welcoming back young Afghan from the diaspora.


Information on Scholarships

Afghan Culture And Traditions


The time lost in decades of war broke the chain of passing down our culture and practices from last generation to next. Young generations of Afghans either grew up in Immigration or their families were too caught up in day to day survival; social respect and norms were lost in those struggles. We bring stories of past culture and present issues that could be solved with reviving those cultures. You can share your stories at info@firstlady.gov.af

Preservation of Historical Monuments and Cultural Heritage of Afghanistan 2016-05-27

In order to preserve and support historical monuments, cultural heritage, and creative art of Afghanistan, a Trust Fund was created by Mrs. Irina Bokova, head of UNESCO in Afghanistan, in presence of H.E. Muhammad Ashraf Ghani, president of Afghanistan, H.E. the First Lady of Afghanistan, Ambassadors and Afghan Media in Delkusha Palace, on May 27th, 2016. The formation of this Trust Fund will be very helpful, especially to strengthen the Creative Art and preserve Cultural Heritage of Afghanistan, which would also provide jobs to our people. It will also help Afghans, visitors, and tourists in understanding the history and culture of Afghanistan.
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Recent Meetings / Encounters


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Vision and Mission

As he was being sworn in as President of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan on September 29, 2014/Mizan 7, 1393, H.E. Ashraf Ghani thanked his wife thus automatically underlining the establishment of Afghanistan’s First Lady Office. The decision for the Office to focus on social and non-political issues was based on the Background of H.E. the First Lady and her previous work assisting IDPs (internally displaced people) and children working on the streets of Kabul. The office of H.E. the First Lady of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan was established in October 2014/Mizan 1393.

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Vision

A prosperous Afghanistan where all Afghans, especially women, are respected regardless of ethnic background, gender, power or position.

Mission

To improve the provision of quality services to all vulnerable sections of the population through monitoring and facilitation.

Areas of Interest

Basic needs in Afghanistan are enormous. Given the non-political nature of this office and its recent establishment, the main areas of interest are:

  • Assessing the needs of vulnerable populations
  • Focusing on capacity building and job creation
  • Access to quality health, education and legal services especially at the provincial level
  • Afghan Culture and Islamic Civilization

Open Door Policy

The Office of the First Lady Has Adopted an Open Door Policy

Hundreds of groups and individuals from all over Afghanistan have come and still do, hoping to share their concerns, hopes, and achievements, wiht the First Lady.
The Office of the First Lady has served as a channel for these citizens, connecting them with relevant branches of government to ensure their voice is heard.

How to Arrange for a Meeting

Please contact our office by e-mail at info@firstlady.gov.af
You will be requested to state the reason why you want to meet with the First Lady as well as some information about your activities and those of your group.
The Office will then inform you of the date of your meeting and will provide you with directions to the Office.

Who is Granted a Meeting?

The First Lady is happy to meet with all sections of society.
She is especially intrested in helping groups that are active in Afghan society develop their potential and reach their goals.
The Office of the First Lady is not allocated an operational budget. In other words, this Office has no funds to distribute. The Office does provide assistance in networking and access to information.





Public Awareness Campaigns


"I Shall Not Remain Silent"

BibiGul on Drug Abuse, November 2015

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



The First Lady is speaking up on a few National Issues:

. Promoting Peace / Awareness Against Violence
. Literacy
. Environment
. Health:  Cancer, Mother and Child, Drug Abuse

The First Lady is speaking up on a few National Issues:

  • Promoting Peace / Awareness Against Violence
  • Literacy
  • Environment
  • Health: Cancer, Mother and Child, Drug Abuse

Volunteer

We value Volunteerism. Volunteers are an important part of communities and we encourage youth to make this culture common among communities inside and outside the cities. You can register with us as volunteer here.


Women in Afghanistan

"The Afghan woman is strong.She should not be seen as a weak individual.
This is a woman who, after years of war and insecurity, has carried on
relentlessly and assumed her responsibilities. "

Bibigul, Women's International Day, March 8, 2015

"The Afghan woman is strong.She should not be seen as a weak individual. This is a woman who, after years of war and insecurity, has carried on relentlessly and assumed her responsibilities. "

Bibigul, Women's International Day, March 8, 2015

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


large number of groups of women come to see the First Lady. Some are from Kabul, many are from the provinces—sometimes as far away as Shignan/Badakhshan, Nuristan, Jawzjan, Daykundi, Takhar or Ghor. By listening to their concerns and hopes, the First Lady and her team have had to address a variety of issues:



  • women’s access to services: health, legal and administrative(including acquiring personal documents), transport;

  • women’s access to literacy/education/training;

  • women as active members in the economy (agriculture, business, trade);

  • women’s access to leadership positions;

  • women’s security and protection from sexual harassment and violence; prisons, shelters.



  • women’s access to services: health, legal and administrative(including acquiring personal documents), transport;

  • women’s access to literacy/education/training;

  • women as active members in the economy (agriculture, business, trade);

  • women’s access to leadership positions;

  • women’s security and protection from sexual harassment and violence; prisons, shelters.

Our efforts are guided by two main goals:

1. bridging the gap between women in provinces and urban women;
2. romoting mutual respect between men and women.
    1. bridging the gap between women in provinces and urban women;
    2. romoting mutual respect between men and women.

Vulnerable Populations

"He who is standing should reach down to the fallen one"

Saadi Shirazi, 13th Century Poet

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 



Several decades of conflict and war have disrupted the very fabric of Afghan society. Families were torn apart, people were wounded or maimed, some died, other disappeared or moved away, and many widows were left to raise their children on their own. People fled from unsafe locations, some to urban centers in Afghanistan, other to neighboring countries. Over the past fifteen years, the situation has slowly improved and the Afghan extended family, the pillar of Afghan society, is being reconstituted. But the sequels of war remain. The attention of the First Lady and her team is focused on the most vulnerable of these populations:

- IDPs and Returning Refugees
- People With Disabilities and Handicaps
- Orphans and Widows
- Drug addicts and their Families

Several decades of conflict and war have disrupted the very fabric of Afghan society. Families were torn apart, people were wounded or maimed, some died, other disappeared or moved away, and many widows were left to raise their children on their own. People fled from unsafe locations, some to urban centers in Afghanistan, other to neighboring countries. Over the past fifteen years, the situation has slowly improved and the Afghan extended family, the pillar of Afghan society, is being reconstituted. But the sequels of war remain. The attention of the First Lady and her team is focused on the most vulnerable of these populations:

- IDPs and Returning Refugees
- People With Disabilities and Handicaps
- Orphans and Widows
- Drug addicts and their Families

Islamic Civilization


Due to war we have lost our valuable resources that were present in archives and libraries. This is the time to bring back scholarly essays about Islamic Civilization that are written through different course of history by Afghan Scholars- Please share your work with us at info@firstlady.gov.af

Victims of War / The prospect of peace


Four decades of war in Afghanistan has left us with instability, lack of security and lost lives. The war has left many grieved families and gave them little time to heal. This page honors lives that were lost in war through sharing their stories and memories. Please share your story with us at info@firstlady.gov.af

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Fear from Kandahar 2016-09-28

Kandahar is well known as the birthplace of the Taliban, beginning in Arghandab; the birth village of Mullah Muhammad Omar. His popularity increased during the late 80s when he led the Battle of Arghandab, which was an offensive led by Afghan and Soviet forces but ended in utter failure. Arghandab is a district within the central part of Kandahar province, known for its green and agricultural landscape. During my first day in Kandahar I visited Arghandab district and was astounded with what I was seeing within the first few minutes. The mesmerizing beautiful greenery weaving through the district, the calm and hospitable residents, and the river of Arghandab – which dries up during the summer but maintains a crystal clear demeanor through the rest of the year. On the outskirts of the river, next to a small waterway, we had a melon and saw a man who had a shop there - cooling himself off from the heat by immersing himself in the river. My journey across Afghanistan has taken me to many different regions, including Mazar-e-Sharif, Herat, Kandahar and Nangarhar. Each of them has presented some wonderful memories, people and experiences – but the one place that has surprised me tremendously is Kandahar. I found it unpredictably secure, friendlier than many other regions across the country (including some great camera posers), a mutual respect for the law but an underlying struggle for peace regardless. I am glad that my experiences from Kandahar can possibly change the mindsets of people whom are thinking that the entirety of Kandahar could be your graveyard - well yeah! You will find many graveyards in every corner of the city or around the villages. My local friend had asked me while showing me the city, ‘’How did Kandahar look to you?” I frequently answered: ‘’It was amazing and I never thought of such positivity around, but why are there so many cemeteries?” Feroz responded by saying, ‘’ Well, these graveyards are the price of peace in Kandahar.” Even though you will not see any official license plates on cars (mostly being either from a Dubai plate number or without a plate completely), people drive very carefully, following the traffic lights, which would be rare in the capital. I saw a local man standing with his motorcycle at 11pm for the red light in a road which you will not see any other cars passing by. The nightlife among people is busy, many staying out and mingling, eating and chatting past midnight. They are people who love to enjoy life and not live under the shadow of fear. One of the nights I was in ‘AINO MEENA’ (The New Modern City of Kandahar, with beautiful fountains on the road, amazing boulevards and bright lights at night) having dinner with my fellow colleagues and just as we were about to finish the meal, we ordered tea with a hookah. Looking up, we saw three bullet proof cars parked on the roadside with 10 bodyguards around their boss. The restaurant we were having our tea had an open space beside the road so a policeman came and kicked on those cars not to park there and the bodyguards ran towards him. This was the first time during my trip in which I was scared and thought they will beat or kill this police man. The bodyguards had RPGs, Machine Guns and AK47Kalashnikovs. Surprisingly, they were begging the policeman to let them be there. “Once they are eating and finished, then we will leave’’ said one of the guards. The kindness and civility absolutely shocked me. Throughout my time in Kandahar, a friend of a friend allowed me to use a car to drive around if I needed to get around the city. At every police checkpoint, questions were asked such as, "What have you got? A gun, a card?" If I said no, they would ask, "Mind if I check?" And if I agreed, then they would say I am good to go and to stay blessed. I remember my last day in Kandahar when I was asked the same questions at a final police checkpoint and the officer began again with, "What have you got?" and I answered: "I've got myself and this car." He replied: ‘’Then tell me you've got an iPhone and glasses as well!" I ended our conversation by telling him how proud I was to be stopped by such a young and strong police officer. His happiness showed through his face and he shook my hands and said, ‘’Allah De Mal Sha Zwana’’: which means, "May Allah protect you always, young man!" This is how mutual respect happens only in Kandahar. As I have mentioned earlier, every little second in Kandahar was filled with surprises and priceless memories. I can only share a few in this piece of writing but I can happily say that Kandahar is in a state of constant growth and peace. Change your perception and see it for yourself! - Qayce Alamdar
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